21 01, 2017

NBA Stars With The Best Fundamentals

By | January 21st, 2017|Categories: Fundamentals, N.B.A., Players and Coaches|Tags: , , , , , , |1 Comment

Words By: Kevin Ramsey

Ever since it was invented by Dr. James Naismith in 1891 and later adopted by the NBA in 1946, much of basketball’s primary fundamentals have largely remained the same. Disregarding many rules changes over the years, like the addition of the three-point line in 1977, getting good at a basketball still requires a sound understanding of the same principles that were practiced years ago.

One excellent method to improve your game is by copying some of the practices and traits that elite players with solid fundamentals have developed. This article will take a look at some of the most successful NBA stars who display a solid understanding of important fundamentals and what practices others can learn from them.

 

1. Dennis Rodman

Best known for his wild attire and the championships he earned with the Chicago Bulls and Detroit Pistons, Dennis Rodman entered the league being drafted by the “Bad Boy” Pistons in 1986. One of the most aggressive teams in basketball history, the Pistons employed a significant amount of physical play during their tenure at the top of the league in the late 1980’s. This type of physical play was very evident in Rodman’s primary ability; getting rebounds.

Getting a rebound, or as it is typically referred to as a getting a board, is when a player gets the ball in their possession after either a missed field goal or free throw. Getting as many rebounds as possible is very useful for teams as controlling the boards leads to more possessions which naturally leads to more points. Despite measuring at 6’7” in a time where most rebounders were where around 7 feet tall, Dennis Rodman used his physical strength and positional instincts to make up for his height advantage. Rodman was one of the key pieces that made the Chicago Bulls one of the best teams in NBA history.

By knowing how to be in the right place at the right time and anticipate where the ball will land after a missed shot attempt, Rodman recorded some of the best rebounding figures during his time in the NBA. Rodman’s achievements like leading the league in rebounding for half a decade demonstrates that a solid understanding of the fundamentals of rebounding can help any player regardless of their size excel in their game.

2. Chris Paul

Knowing when to pass and when not to pass in basketball is more important than it may seem. While a good pass can generate an assist or a player getting free throws, erroneous passes often lead to turnovers which are equivalent to giving opponents free points. Mastering this skill of making good passes is difficult. However, Los Angeles Clippers point guard Chris Paul has done an excellent job at making the right passes throughout his career. By posting the highest assist-to-turnover by any point guard or player in history, Paul has shown time and time again that he knows the difference between a good pass and a bad pass. Overall, knowing how to make a good pass is a critical skill to master in basketball, and Chris Paul has done an excellent job of demonstrating its importance in his career.

3. Tim Duncan

Nicknamed “The Big Fundamental.” it is not difficult to understand the reason behind Tim Duncan’s immense success in the league. At 6’11” tall, much of Duncan’s play revolved around his perfection of post moves. During his first championship run in 1999, Duncan showed his talent early by easily posting up players and effortlessly turning around to score time and time again. Duncan’s five championships and MVP title is a testament to his commitment to working on his post moves and his fundamentals. When looking at Duncan’s career, kids interested in improving their game can learn that mastering fundamental or simple things like post moves is critical to enhancing their performance on the court.

20 10, 2016

Youth Basketball Guidelines-NBA and USA Basketball

By | October 20th, 2016|Categories: Basketball Coaching, Players and Coaches|Tags: , , , , , , , |2 Comments

There are some new Youth Basketball Guidelines just recently announced. This is great news. Make sure you read about Youth Basketball on our site right here.

Youth Basketball

The NBA and USA Basketball have partnered to develop guidelines designed to promote a positive and healthy youth basketball experience.

Check out the website here

The new guidelines will focuse on health and wellness of the young athlete, including the concept of “Player Segmentation”. Sports Specialization is also discussed and this writer is a big proponent of not specializing in sports too early.  See my other website www.youthinfitness.com for more details.

Their recommendation is to delay early sports specialization until at least age 14.

The 8 Youth Basketball Guidelines summary recommendations:

1. Promote personal engagement in youth basketball and other sports.

2. Youth sports should include both organized and informal, peer-led activities.

3. Youth should participate in a variety of sports.

4. Delay single-sport specialization in the sport of basketball until age 14 or older.

5. Ensure rest from organized basketball at least one day per week, and extended time away from organized basketball each year.

6. Limit high-density scheduling based on age-appropriate guidelines.

7. Further evaluation of basketball-specific neuromuscular injury prevention training program is warranted.

8. Parents and coaches should be educated regarding concepts of sport readiness and injury prevention.

I have to say this is a great thing and it is about time. It is hoped that the other major sports organizations will follow suit and adapt and promote these Youth Sports Guidelines.

Basketball is such a great sport and we don’t need to train kids like mini adults or mini professionals. Trust me. They need to have fun. They’ll work hard bud it can’t be boring for them. Keep them moving and running and they’ll be fine. Let them actually scrimmage and PLAY basketball.

We’d love to hear your comments below so please share your opinion. What have your experiences been while Coaching Youth Basketball? What do you think of these new Youth Basketball Guidelines?

Comment below.

 

 

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